Autumn is the season of letting go. A time to declutter both in your inner landscape and in your environment.

Nature is preparing us for hibernation and the winter. We need to be free of the things that no longer serve us, so that we can conserve our energies for the things that do. In Five Elements philosophy, Autumn is associated with the emotion of sadness, the turning inwards of our energies, a sense of loss even. As the leaves fall from the trees and things are pared away, we are left with the essentials, the essence of what is precious to us, what we value and respect.

Now is the time to take stock, to go through your cupboards, both metaphorical and physical. Get rid of what no longer serves you. The beliefs that are past their sell-by date. The ideas or plans that no longer ring true.  The attitudes that create division and separation. Set aside some time, on a Sunday perhaps, to take stock of the people who feature in your life, your relationships, and where you are with them. Where do you need to re-adjust, say thank you, clear up old hurts, forgive, or let go? Having made some space by letting go of the old, ask yourself what inspires you? What do you bring into your life on a regular basis that keeps you in touch with your true sense  of yourself? What do you do to nurture your soul, your creativity, your passion for life?

Set aside another Sunday to clear out your wardrobe, your kitchen cupboards, your paperwork. Set your house in order.

You’ll be amazed at the sense of lightness and space you can generate for yourself in this season of  downward-turning energy. Sadness is not bad, dangerous or to be resisted. It reminds us to value the precious things in life, to treasure what we have and to take time to take care of our essential self. Let go. Open up space. Trust in the possibilities that lie ahead.

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